Citations

Not-­so­-legitimate aims and other sorry tales of Canadian mass surveillance

September 13, 2014 - by Cynthia Khoo.

In joining the global movement against mass surveillance, Canadians face many challenges in terms of getting their own house in order. Many Canada’s surveillance policies and practices clearly violate the international human rights law, including the International Principles on the Application of Human Rights to Communications Surveillance. This article outlines this fact, especially with regard to the principles of "legitimate aim," "competent judicial authority," and "proportionality."

The urgent need for MLAT reform

September 12, 2014 - by Drew Mitnick.

The process for sharing criminal investigation information between countries is broken. This article describes why MLAT reform is urgently needed.

The legacy and legality of 12333

September 12, 2014 - by Josh Levy.

In December 1981 President Ronald Reagan signed Executive Order 12333, giving U.S. intelligence agencies more power to direct federal agencies to conduct surveillance. More than 20 years later, George W. Bush signed two more executive orders that strengthened and expanded these same powers. President Obama has continued the legacy of, and expanded his administration's authority under, the order. Executive orders are not the result of debated legislation — they're embodiments of executive authority, rendered unilaterally and, on occasion, secretly — and as such they aren't subject to oversight or review by the judiciary or by Congress, much less scrutiny from the general public.

“India’s Surveillance State” – Our Report On Communications Surveillance in India

September 3, 2014 - by SFLC.in. The report delves into communications surveillance in India and takes an in­depth look at various aspects of India’s surveillance machinery, including enabling provisions of law, service provider obligations, and known mechanisms. It examines compliance of India’s legal provisions on surveillance with the International Principles on the Application of Human Rights to Communications Surveillance that were formulated after a global consultation with civil society groups, industry, and international experts in communications surveillance law, policy, and technology.

A Concrete Proposal to Enshrine the Necessary and Proportionate Principles Thus Ending Mass Surveillance

June 30, 2014 - by Association for Proper Internet Governance.

On 30 June 2014, pursuant to Resolution 68/167 of the United National General Assembly, the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights (HCHR) published a report on the protection and promotion of the right to privacy in the context of domestic and extraterritorial surveillance and/or the interception of digital communications and the collection of personal data, including on a mass scale. The Association for Proper Internet Governance (APIG) thanks and commends the High Commissioner for this courageous, frank, objective, well reasoned and balanced report.

Piden Desde México el Fin de la Vigilancia Masiva

January 6, 2014 - by Julio Sánchez (Spanish). 

Onofre El próximo 7 de enero arrancará en México una campaña convocada por el colectivo de activistas digitales ContingenteMX para exigir ante las autoridades nacionales e internacionales el fin de la vigilancia masiva a las comunicaciones electrónicas de los usuarios, como el efectuado por la agencia de seguridad estadounidense (NSA) que salió a la luz gracias a las revelaciones de Edward Snowden.

“Exigimos el fin de la vigilancia masiva”: ContingenteMX

January 6, 2014 - by Homozapping (Spanish).

Uno de los principales sucesos noticiosos del año pasado fue, sin duda, las revelaciones de Edward Snowden en torno a los distintos programas de espionaje que el gobierno de Estados Unidos tiene en marcha.

One Small Step for Privacy, One Giant Leap Against Surveillance

December 18, 2013 - by Katitza Rodriguez and Jillian York.

The UN Resolution opens the opportunity for further work on the issue by the United Nations on the protection of privacy across borders. Fortunately, EFF and several other NGOs and legal scholars around the world have already developed a set of robust principles, called the 13 International Principles for the Application of Human Rights to Communications Surveillance—or more commonly, the “Necessary and Proportionate Principles.”

Increasing Anti­-Surveillance Momentum and the Necessary and Proportionate Principles

December 16, 2013 by Katitza Rodriguez, Cindy Cohn, and Parker Higgins.

EFF and several other NGOs and legal scholars around the world have already developed a set of robust principles, called the 13 International Principles for the Application of Human Rights to Communications Surveillance—or more commonly, the Necessary and Proportionate Principles. These can be used by people around the world to push for stronger local legal protections, as well as by the United Nations and other international bodies. The Principles have so far been endorsed by over 329 organizations, 43 experts and elected officials, and thousands of individuals from around the world. It's also open for signature by companies. The Principles look beyond the current set of revelations to take a broad look at how modern communications surveillance technologies can be addressed consistent with human rights and the rule of law.

Tvoj glas protiv masovnog nadgledanja

December 15, 2013 - by SHARE Conference.

SHARE je poziva građane Interneta da daju svoj glas protiv masovnog nadgledanja i potpišu Principe.

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